What are the current trends contributing to the high ranking and the future path of this health care organization?

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What are the current trends contributing to the high ranking and the future path of this health care organization?

Health Care Organizations in U.S. Conduct a research on one of the top fifteen health care organizations in the U.S. Your research should include the following questions: How will you find listings of the top fifteen health care systems? What are the various components of the selected health care system? How does it rank in terms of reduced mortality and infection rates? What are the services provided by the healthcare delivery system? What are the current trends contributing to the high ranking and the future path of this health care organization? How does the organization manage and distribute resources for improved patient care? In a Microsoft Word document, create a 2- to 3-page report, on the basis of your research. Provide at least two resources or journal articles referring to the selected organization. Support your responses with examples. Cite any sources in APA format. Submission Details Name your document SU_HSC4021_W4_A2_LastName_FirstInitial.doc. Submit your document to the W4 Assignment 2 Dropbox by Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Assignment 2 Grading Criteria Maximum Points An Content downloaded/printed from HeinOnline Sun Sep 3 01:39:53 2017 — Your use of this HeinOnline PDF indicates your acceptance of HeinOnline’s Terms and Conditions of the license agreement available at http://heinonline.org/HOL/License — The search text of this PDF is generated from uncorrected OCR text. — To obtain permission to use this article beyond the scope of your HeinOnline license, please use: Copyright Information Use QR Code reader to send PDF to your smartphone or tablet device DIGNIT, LIBERTY, EQUALITY: A FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS TRIANGLE OF CONSTITUTIONALISMt What is the relationship among fundamental rights to equality, to liberty, and to dignity? In several political and legal contexts, developments in equality law tend to be stalled by reference to dignity and have traditionally been limited based on an understanding that equality collides with liberty – as in the ideological opposition between socialism and capitalist liberalism, as in most balancing theories, and as in philosophical concepts of rights that trump one another. In addition, all three fundamental rights have been conceptualized in rather ambivalent ways, with some dominant as well as some relatively silenced philosophical (including religious) interpretations. Equality, liberty, and, particularly ambivalent, dignity carry burdens that serve as entry points for rather problematic ways of interpreting these notions. Dignity is either defined as an abstract principle or narrowed down to a right against extreme abuse, and it has been charged with moralistic ideology. Liberty and equality have mostly been set on a collision course, balanced against each other, with ideological baggage of their own. Observations in comparative constitutionalism reveal that, in some jurisdictions, dignity tends to become a black box, while equality tends to be limited by using dignity and liberty tends to trump the other two. Such studies, however also provide inspiration for a new approach to all three fundamental rights. I propose here that we rethink their histories as well as current developments. I suggest a triangle of fundamental rights as a more appropriate metaphor to understand the complexity of cases that arise in the area and to better decide them. Dignity, equality, and liberty are, then, the corners of a triangle rather than the ends of a scale or the top and sides of a pyramid, and thus inspire a more holistic understanding of what fundamental rights are about. Keywords: dignity/liberty/equality/balancing/feminism/critical legal studies/comparative constitutionalism/ideology in law Professor of Public Law & Gender Studies, Humboldt-Universit~t zu Berlin, Germany. – This article is based on the 2007 Wright Lecture, given at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, in memory of former dean Cecil A. Wright. I was honoured by the invitation, and am extremely grateful to the faculty and its guests for their distinct way of engaging with ideas to strengthen an argument, rather than simply to disagree, although some certainly do. I also want to thank Beverly Baines, Janine Benedet, Nora Markard, and the team at Humboldt University, Catharine MacKinnon, the anonymous UTLJ reviewers, and Rayner Thwaites for extremely helpful suggestions, and Jordan Long and Oliver David Welch for language revisions. Finally, I was lucky to enjoy the wonderful services of the library research assistants at the University of Michigan Law School. (2009), 59 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAWJOURNAL Susanne Baer* DOI: 10.3138/utlj.59.4.417 418 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAWJOURNAL I Introduction

Health Care Organizations in U.S.

Conduct a research on one of the top fifteen health care organizations in the U.S.

Your research should include the following questions:

How will you find listings of the top fifteen health care systems?
What are the various components of the selected health care system? How does it rank in terms of reduced mortality and infection rates?
What are the services provided by the healthcare delivery system?
What are the current trends contributing to the high ranking and the future path of this health care organization?
How does the organization manage and distribute resources for improved patient care?
In a Microsoft Word document, create a 2- to 3-page report, on the basis of your research. Provide at least two resources or journal articles referring to the selected organization.

Support your responses with examples.

Cite any sources in APA format.

Submission Details

Name your document SU_HSC4021_W4_A2_LastName_FirstInitial.doc.

Submit your document to the W4 Assignment 2 Dropbox by Tuesday, June 13, 2017.

Assignment 2 Grading Criteria
Maximum Points
An

Content downloaded/printed from HeinOnline
Sun Sep 3 01:39:53 2017
— Your use of this HeinOnline PDF indicates your acceptance
of HeinOnline’s Terms and Conditions of the license
agreement available at http://heinonline.org/HOL/License
— The search text of this PDF is generated from
uncorrected OCR text.
— To obtain permission to use this article beyond the scope
of your HeinOnline license, please use:
Copyright Information
Use QR Code reader to send PDF to
your smartphone or tablet device
DIGNIT, LIBERTY, EQUALITY:
A FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS TRIANGLE
OF CONSTITUTIONALISMt
What is the relationship among fundamental rights to equality, to liberty, and to
dignity? In several political and legal contexts, developments in equality law tend
to be stalled by reference to dignity and have traditionally been limited based on an
understanding that equality collides with liberty – as in the ideological opposition
between socialism and capitalist liberalism, as in most balancing theories, and as
in philosophical concepts of rights that trump one another. In addition, all three fundamental
rights have been conceptualized in rather ambivalent ways, with some dominant
as well as some relatively silenced philosophical (including religious)
interpretations. Equality, liberty, and, particularly ambivalent, dignity carry
burdens that serve as entry points for rather problematic ways of interpreting these
notions. Dignity is either defined as an abstract principle or narrowed down to a
right against extreme abuse, and it has been charged with moralistic ideology.
Liberty and equality have mostly been set on a collision course, balanced against
each other, with ideological baggage of their own. Observations in comparative constitutionalism
reveal that, in some jurisdictions, dignity tends to become a black box,
while equality tends to be limited by using dignity and liberty tends to trump the
other two. Such studies, however also provide inspiration for a new approach to all
three fundamental rights. I propose here that we rethink their histories as well as
current developments. I suggest a triangle of fundamental rights as a more appropriate
metaphor to understand the complexity of cases that arise in the area and to better
decide them. Dignity, equality, and liberty are, then, the corners of a triangle rather
than the ends of a scale or the top and sides of a pyramid, and thus inspire a
more holistic understanding of what fundamental rights are about.
Keywords: dignity/liberty/equality/balancing/feminism/critical legal
studies/comparative constitutionalism/ideology in law
Professor of Public Law & Gender Studies, Humboldt-Universit~t zu Berlin, Germany.
– This article is based on the 2007 Wright Lecture, given at the Faculty of Law, University
of Toronto, in memory of former dean Cecil A. Wright. I was honoured by the
invitation, and am extremely grateful to the faculty and its guests for their distinct
way of engaging with ideas to strengthen an argument, rather than simply to
disagree, although some certainly do. I also want to thank Beverly Baines, Janine
Benedet, Nora Markard, and the team at Humboldt University, Catharine
MacKinnon, the anonymous UTLJ reviewers, and Rayner Thwaites for extremely
helpful suggestions, and Jordan Long and Oliver David Welch for language revisions.
Finally, I was lucky to enjoy the wonderful services of the library research assistants
at the University of Michigan Law School.
(2009), 59 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAWJOURNAL
Susanne Baer*
DOI: 10.3138/utlj.59.4.417
418 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LAWJOURNAL
I Introduction


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