The Effects of Dental Amalgam on the Environment

Create a single Excel file for your entire assignment. Spend time to understand what you are trying to do and simplify your format, your calculations and approach. Think about which ratios are important and WHY?
August 17, 2020
For Investment A: Using Microsoft Excel, create a decision tree. Indicate the various levels of demand and their respective probabilities. Also, include the calculations for the expected cash flows. Calculate the expected NPV for each alternative. Explain the decision rules for making a selection between the two alternatives on the basis of the expected NPV. Assuming the two alternatives are mutually exclusive, specify which alternative you would recommend to the company. Explain why. If the two alternatives were independent of each other, specify which project you would select. Would you accept both projects if funding were available for both? Explain your answer.
August 18, 2020

The Effects of Dental Amalgam on the Environment

The Effects of Dental Amalgam on the Environment The disposal of dental amalgam, specifically the mercury component, has become a controversial topic in the past twenty years. Due to the concern this issue brings, many studies have taken place regarding the effect of mercury on the environment and in humans. Amalgam is the most common material used in restorative dentistry due to its low cost, ease of use and stability (Chin et al., 2000). The basic ingredients include silver, tin, copper and mercury. Mercury is the most abundant component in amalgam and can be toxic in different forms, such as dust or vapor (Drummond, Cailas & Croke, 2003). Amalgam waste is generated during placement and replacement of restorative materials. There are two types of amalgam waste: contact and non-contact amalgam. Contact amalgam includes amalgam that has been in contact with the tooth surface. Non-contact amalgam includes excess material that was either not placed in the restoration or left in the capsule that the amalgam came in. Contact amalgam accounts for the majority of the contami...  

The Effects of Dental Amalgam on the Environment
The disposal of dental amalgam, specifically the mercury component, has become a controversial topic in the past twenty years. Due to the concern this issue brings, many studies have taken place regarding the effect of mercury on the environment and in humans.
Amalgam is the most common material used in restorative dentistry due to its low cost, ease of use and stability (Chin et al., 2000). The basic ingredients include silver, tin, copper and mercury. Mercury is the most abundant component in amalgam and can be toxic in different forms, such as dust or vapor (Drummond, Cailas & Croke, 2003).
Amalgam waste is generated during placement and replacement of restorative materials. There are two types of amalgam waste: contact and non-contact amalgam. Contact amalgam includes amalgam that has been in contact with the tooth surface. Non-contact amalgam includes excess material that was either not placed in the restoration or left in the capsule that the amalgam came in. Contact amalgam accounts for the majority of the contami…

 


PLACE THIS ORDER OR A SIMILAR ORDER AND GET HELP FROM A CERTIFIED WRITER:)

Click the button below to order this paper AND ENJOY OUR DISCOUNT.

E
E

Comments are closed.