Why were these attributions and assumptions made in each situation? Are they most likely accurate or not? What are some alternative explanations for the behaviors of the waitress and person pumping gas? Why do we typically not assume these later explanations but rather jump to the conclusions made in the examples? If you were the person in each of these scenarios and took a minute to look back at these behaviors would you have the same thoughts about yourself (you are in the wrong job or that you are a jerk)? Why might the attributions of your own behaviors be different than your attributions of others’ behaviors? With all of this in mind how will you apply this to your future attributions and associated behavior when faced with these types of situations?

First Part I want 2 Journals about interpersonal communication. just 5 sentences for each journal with quality entries on the following topics: a) the relationship they have chosen to improve for this semester, b) any references they have found in the news media that relate to interpersona communication, c) ideas and thoughts from the chapter readings that they can use to improve their personal and/or professional lives, d) free write anything that comes into their minds.
September 27, 2020
Convert the ingredients in your recipe from its original imperial units into metric units. Post both the original and converted recipe in the same post so that your classmates and instructor can look at the differences. There is no need to post the preparation or cooking instructions — only the ingredients. Was it difficult to make the conversion from one system of units to the other? Why, or why not? Time to shift your focus to another system of measurements. Now, use an online mapping program to find out how far you will have to travel to get to one of Kaplan’s graduation ceremonies (in Chicago, IL or Miami, FL) from your hometown. Approximately how far in miles and in kilometers will you have to travel? What if you wanted to know what the distance would be in smaller units? In the imperial system you could convert miles into yards and feet. Using SI units you could convert kilometers into meters and centimeters. Convert the data from question 3 into the number of feet and meters you will have to travel. Which system (Imperial or SI) did you find easier to calculate the smaller distances in? Why? Humans have used different systems of measurement throughout history. Do some research on your own, and find a unit of measurement that you did not know about before and give a brief description of its history. Explain how to convert it into a unit of measurement that people would be familiar with today.
September 27, 2020

Why were these attributions and assumptions made in each situation? Are they most likely accurate or not? What are some alternative explanations for the behaviors of the waitress and person pumping gas? Why do we typically not assume these later explanations but rather jump to the conclusions made in the examples? If you were the person in each of these scenarios and took a minute to look back at these behaviors would you have the same thoughts about yourself (you are in the wrong job or that you are a jerk)? Why might the attributions of your own behaviors be different than your attributions of others’ behaviors? With all of this in mind how will you apply this to your future attributions and associated behavior when faced with these types of situations?

social psychology mod 2 discussion We make attributions every day about our own behaviors and the behaviors of the people that we interact with. And depending on what we attribute to the cause of a person or our behavior this directly affects our attitudes and behaviors toward that person. If our attributions are correct, then outcome can be positive, as they can help us to work more effectively with that person or to make better decisions for ourselves. However, if we make an error in our attribution of the cause of a behavior, then our own following behaviors can negatively compound the situation. Consider the following situations that we have all experienced: You go out to lunch with your friend and find that your waitress is a bit absentminded and is not in the best of mood as she takes your order and serves you. You tell your friend that this lady should not be a waitress and needs to find a new job because her attitude stinks. You pull into a gas station and there is only one free pump, but you cannot get to it because there is a person at the first pump. You think to yourself "What a jerk, I can't believe they did not pull up to the second pump." Why were these attributions and assumptions made in each situation? Are they most likely accurate or not? What are some alternative explanations for the behaviors of the waitress and person pumping gas? Why do we typically not assume these later explanations but rather jump to the conclusions made in the examples? If you were the person in each of these scenarios and took a minute to look back at these behaviors would you have the same thoughts about yourself (you are in the wrong job or that you are a jerk)? Why might the attributions of your own behaviors be different than your attributions of others' behaviors? With all of this in mind how will you apply this to your future attributions and associated behavior when faced with these types of situations?

social psychology mod 2 discussion

We make attributions every day about our own behaviors and the behaviors of the people that we interact with. And depending on what we attribute to the cause of a person or our behavior this directly affects our attitudes and behaviors toward that person. If our attributions are correct, then outcome can be positive, as they can help us to work more effectively with that person or to make better decisions for ourselves. However, if we make an error in our attribution of the cause of a behavior, then our own following behaviors can negatively compound the situation.
Consider the following situations that we have all experienced:
You go out to lunch with your friend and find that your waitress is a bit absentminded and is not in the best of mood as she takes your order and serves you. You tell your friend that this lady should not be a waitress and needs to find a new job because her attitude stinks.
You pull into a gas station and there is only one free pump, but you cannot get to it because there is a person at the first pump. You think to yourself “What a jerk, I can’t believe they did not pull up to the second pump.”
Why were these attributions and assumptions made in each situation? Are they most likely accurate or not?

What are some alternative explanations for the behaviors of the waitress and person pumping gas? Why do we typically not assume these later explanations but rather jump to the conclusions made in the examples?

If you were the person in each of these scenarios and took a minute to look back at these behaviors would you have the same thoughts about yourself (you are in the wrong job or that you are a jerk)? Why might the attributions of your own behaviors be different than your attributions of others’ behaviors?

With all of this in mind how will you apply this to your future attributions and associated behavior when faced with these types of situations?


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